Browse Primary Sources

Subject is exactly Pulitzer board

Letter of Introduction to the Pulitzer Prize Committee - Paul Steiger

"In 1994, Tony Horwitz didn't just write about the plight of America's working poor. He went to work himself, on the kill floor of chicekn plants in Mississippi and Arkanses. The result is a shocking expose of a world in which workers are maimed, degraded and discarded in exchange for a poverty wage. . ."

Wall Street Journal  1995-01-23

"The Mirage Non-Award" - Columbia Journalism Review

"The reasoning of the board majority, according to abundant leaks, was that the Sun-Times report involved deception bordering on entrapment . . . This writer must question the wisdom of the majority. The central issue is: how else could such corruption be exposed? If the reporters had simply quizzed bar owners, none would have provided documented evidence on the record. If one had, he'd soon have been out of business. Moreover, there are ample defensible precedents for judicious use of the technique. . . . Believing the Mirage case to be well within the bounds of responsible, defensible conduct, this column offers its own imaginary award to the Chicago Sun-Times for service to its community."

Columbia Journalism Review  1979-09-01

"The Mirage Takes Shape" - Zay N. Smith and Pamela Zekman - Columbia Journalism Review

"Every editor had his own way of saying: nice idea, but let's get serious. It was time she learned Hoge's way. 'We'd have to budget at least a year ahead for something like that,' he said. 'At least a year.' Zekman slowed the stroll. 'Are you saying . . .?' 'And there are a lot of questions. Entrapment for one. Security. We'd have to go at it very carefully.' 'Are you saying we could actually do it?' 'Let me take a look at the budget. That's where we'd have to start.'

Columbia Journalism Review  1979-09-01

"Pulitzers: Was Mirage a Deception?" - Columbia Journalism Review

"James Reston helped to define the issue when he reportedly drew a distinction between 'pretense' and 'deception' at the [Pulitzer] board meeting. Pretense, in this scheme is a passive act: the reporter allows someone to draw the wrong conclusion about who he is or what he knows. Deception, however, is active; the reporter intends to mislead. 'It's biblical, man,' says [Ben] Bradlee of the Post. 'How can newspapers fight for honesy and integrity when they themslevse are less than honest in getting a story? Would you want a cop to pose as a newspaperman?' Other board members, however, admit that they have allowed reporters to conceal their identities in the past, and most reserve the right to do so in the future."

Columbia Journalism Review  1979-07-01